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Open-Channel Microfluidics

Fundamentals and applications
Jean Berthier, Ashleigh B Theberge, Erwin Berthier

Description

Jean Berthier is based at the University of Washington in Seattle. He is the author of Microfluidics for Biotechnology, Microdrops and Digital Microfluidics, The physics of micro-droplets, and Open Microfluidics.

Ashleigh B Theberge is an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Washington and an adjunct assistant professor of urology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She leads the Bioanalytical Chemistry for Medicine and the Environment group.

Erwin Berthier is a co-founder and CTO of Tasso Inc, a Seattle-based company developing patient-centric, distributed, health technologies. He is a co-author of Open Microfluidics and currently works within the department of chemistry at the University of Washington.

About Editors

Jean Berthier received a MS in mathematics from the University of Grenoble, an engineering diploma from the Grenoble Institute of Technology and a PhD from the Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris. After spending four years at Sandia and Los Alamos National laboratories, he joined the CEA-Leti in Grenoble, France. In 2018 he joined the University of Washington in Seattle. He is the author of Microfluidics for Biotechnology, Microdrops and Digital Microfluidics, The physics of micro-droplets, and Open Microfluidics.

Ashleigh B Theberge is an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Washington and an adjunct assistant professor of urology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She received a BA in chemistry from Williams College and a PhD in chemistry from the University of Cambridge. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship in biomedical engineering, toxicology, and urology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In 2016 she joined the faculty at the University of Washington where she leads the Bioanalytical Chemistry for Medicine and the Environment group.

Erwin Berthier is a co-founder and CTO of Tasso Inc, a Seattle-based company developing patient-centric, distributed, health technologies. He received a Diplôme D'Ingénieur in fluid mechanics from the École Nationale Supérieure de Techniques Avancées, Paris, a masters of electrical engineering from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and a PhD in biomedical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is a co-author of Open Microfluidics and currently works in the department of chemistry at the University of Washington.

Table of Contents

Nomenclature  

 

Introduction: open-channel microfluidics and open microfluidics

1.            Paper-based microfluidics           

2.            Thread-based microfluidics         

3.            Sessile droplets microfluidics     

4.            Open-channel microfluidics       

5.            Book contents 

References

 

Chap.1. Capillarity theoretical basis         

Introduction     

1.1.        Liquid surface tension   

1.2.        Laplace pressure             

1.3.        Liquid-liquid surface tension     

1.4.        Contact with solid surface: Young's law 

1.5.        Neumann's construction

1.6.        Work of adhesion, work of cohesion and the Young-Duprė equation       

1.7.        Solid surface energy: Zisman's approach

1.7.1.    Using Young's law           

1.7.2.    Using Zisman's plot       

1.8.        Wetting and pinning

1.8.1.    Wetting               

1.8.2.     Pinning and canthotaxis

1.9.        Wenzel law       

1.10.      Cassie-Baxter law           

1.11.      Capillary rise

1.12.      Marangoni convection 

References       

 

Chap.2. Condition for capillary flow in open channels     

Abstract             

2.1.        Spontaneous capillary flow in monolithic channel             

2.2.       Spontaneous capillary flow in composite open channels: the generalized Cassie condition

2.3.       Enhanced open capillary flows 

2.3.1.    Constant additional inlet pressure

2.3.2.     Overfilled reservoir: Initial additional Laplace pressure   

2.4. Conclusions             

References

 

Chap.3. Flow dynamics in open channels             

Abstract             

3.1.        Background: Spontaneous capillary flow in composite, closed-channels of arbitrary uniform cross-section               

3.2.        Flow dynamics in open micro-channels of uniform cross section 

3.3.        Flow dynamics in open micro-channels of variable cross section 

3.3.1.    Sudden constriction and enlargements 

3.3.2.    Sudden enlargement with pinning: Open capillary valves

3.3.3.    Progressive enlargements           

3.3.4.    Capillary pumps

3.3.5.    Filters   

3.3.6.    One-way wicking             

3.4.        The capillary dynamics of non-Newtonian fluids

3.4.1.     Shear-thinning fluids     

3.4.2.     The case of whole blood             

References       

 

Chap.4. Open-channel geometries         

Abstract             

Introduction     

4.1.        Rectangular channels   

4.2.        Rectangular channels with imperfect corners     

4.3.        Rounded channels         

4.4.        Semi-cylindrical channel               

4.5.        Suspended channels     

4.6.        Rails     

4.7.        Embossed channels       

4.8.        Fiber bundles and flow caging   

4.9.        Capillary rise and uphill open capillary flows       

4.10.      Capillary networks         

4.10.1.  Example #1       

4.10.2.  Example #2       

4.10.3.  Capillary flow after a bypass or a derivation         

Conclusion

References       

 

Chap.5. Capillary filaments         

Abstract             

5.1.        Capillary filaments: the Concus-Finn condition   

5.2.        The case of V-grooves 

5.3.        Capillary filaments in open-channel turns             

5.4.        Capillary filaments in non-uniform channels       

5.5.        Detached capillary filaments     

5.6.        Metastable capillary filaments 

5.7.        Capillary filaments driving SCF

5.8.        Dynamics of capillary filaments 

5.9.        Drying of capillary filaments       

5.10.      Capillary filaments stopped by rounded wedges

Conclusion         

References       

 

Chap.6. Two-phase open-channel capillary flows

Introduction     

6.1.       Plugs in uniform cross-section open-channels   

6.1.1.     Quasi-steady state approach: SCF condition in presence of plugs

6.1.2.     Plugs dynamics in open-channel capillary flow   

6.1.3.     Conclusions       

6.1.4.     Capillary wagons

6.2.       Bypasses and bifurcations           

6.2.1.     Bifurcations       

6.2.2.     Bypasses           

6.3.        Plugs and capillary filaments     

6.3.1.     Plugs moved by capillary filaments         

6.3.2.     Plugs blocked by reverse capillary filaments       

Conclusions       

References       

 

Chap.7. Applications     

Abstract             

7.1.        Materials and fabrication             

7.2.        Space: design of vanes 

7.2.1.    Space cup           

7.2.2.    Vanes 

7.3.        Microfluidics     

7.3.1.    Capillary channels on paper       

7.3.2.    Evaporation capillary pumping 

7.4.        Biology, biotechnology and medicine

7.4.1.    Gel electrophoresis       

7.4.2.    Micro-Dots for cell studies         

7.4.3.    Mimicking lungs               

7.4.4.    Micro-device for cell behavior studies   

7.4.5.    In-vivo sensors 

7.4.6.    Open-channel microfluidics for whole blood analysis       

7.5.        Biochemistry: Liquid-liquid extraction

Conclusion         

References       

 

Chap 8: Epilog   

References         

Bibliographic

Paperback ISBN: 9780750330046

Ebook ISBN: 9781643276632

DOI: 10.1088/2053-2571/ab21ca

Publisher: Morgan & Claypool Publishers

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